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Welcome to the EVENT SCHEDULE & DIRECTORY for the 10th Annual Salt Lake County Watershed Symposium
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Full Event Program  

Congratulations to Carl Adams of DWQ. He was nominated by peers, and celebrated with peers, as the 2016 Watershed Steward of the Year!

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Tuesday, November 15
 

9:00am

Welcome & Opening Comments
Speakers
LB

Lori Bays

Deputy Mayor/Chief Administrative Officer, Salt Lake County
Lori first joined Mayor McAdams’ team as director of the Human Services Department in 2013, and was promoted to Deputy Mayor and Chief Administrative Officer in September 2015. Lori has more than 16 years of experience in local government and Health and Human Services. Prior to joining Salt Lake County, Lori was a Health and Human Services Agency Executive for San Diego County. Before that, she served as Director of the Office of Public... Read More →
avatar for Robert Thompson

Robert Thompson

Watershed Section Manager, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration
Robert Thompson manages the Salt Lake County Watershed section and is a professionally licensed Geologist in the state of Utah. He specializes in fluvial geomorphology and the restoration of fluvial systems. He has a background in water quality data collection, restoration design, construction and monitoring and education. His outside interests include river running, cycling and trail running.


Tuesday November 15, 2016 9:00am - 9:10am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:10am

KEYNOTE: A Decade of Working Together
A Decade of Working Together
In the Watershed Symposium inaugural keynote, Niermeyer will focus on the importance of continued collaboration to address the many different issues and interests of many stakeholders that are present in our watersheds, recognizing the value of the 10 years of history of the Salt Lake County Watershed Symposium in this collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Niermeyer

Jeff Niermeyer

Retired
Jeff graduated from the University of Utah with a B.S. Civil Engineering. He has focused his career on water resource management. Prior to his retirement in January of 2016, he served as the Director of the Department of Public Utilities for Salt Lake City. He was appointed by Mayor Rocky Anderson in 2007 after serving as Deputy Director for the previous 10 years. Responsible for the overall water, sewer and storm water functions for Salt Lake... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 9:10am - 9:35am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:35am

Film Short
Tuesday November 15, 2016 9:35am - 9:45am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:55am

Leaving the Past Behind: Water Supply Forecasting in the Great Basin
Leaving the Past Behind: Water Supply Forecasting in the Great Basin
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC) provides forecasts of water supply conditions to resource managers throughout the Eastern Great Basin regions using Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) methods that are largely driven by historical observations of temperature and precipitation. Currently, the CBRFC does not incorporate climatic information, such as teleconnections (e.g., the El Niño Southern Oscillation [ENSO]), into the development of its streamflow ensembles; further, as the impacts of climate change are realized, the past may no longer be representative of future conditions. To address these issues, the CBRFC is investigating the incorporation of a Stochastic Weather Generator (SWG) developed by the University of Colorado. Additionally, numerous agencies issue climate outlooks that describe the probability that a region with experience warmer, normal, or cooler conditions with regards to temperature and wetter, normal, or drier conditions with regards to precipitation. Research published by the University of Colorado has shown that a SWG weighted by probabilities related to the ENSO may improve forecast skill in the San Juan River Basin, as well as other regions outside of the Colorado River Basin. In this study, the SWG is applied within the Great Basin and weighted using climate probabilities developed by the National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center. The ensemble of streamflow events developed using the SWG is then compared to historical ensembles used in the forecast of water supply over the region.

Moderators
avatar for Austin White

Austin White

Field Technician, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration

Speakers
avatar for W. Paul Miller

W. Paul Miller

Service Coordination Hydrologist, Colorado Basin River Forecast Center
Paul Miller currently works for the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center as the Service Coordination Hydrologist in Salt Lake City, Utah. Prior to joining the CBRFC in November 2012, Paul worked for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region for about 7 years investigating the impacts of climate change to the Colorado River Basin. Paul received his B.S. in Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources from the University of Arizona in... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 9:55am - 10:20am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:55am

Persistent Urban Impacts On Surface Water Quality in the Wasatch Front
Persistent Urban Impacts On Surface Water Quality in the Wasatch Front
Growing population centers along mountain watersheds put added stress on sensitive hydrologic systems and create water quality impacts downstream. We examined the mountain-to-urban transition in watersheds on Utah’s Wasatch Front to identify mechanisms by which urbanization impacts water resources. Rivers in the Wasatch flow from the mountains directly into an urban landscape, where they are subject to channelization, stormwater runoff systems, and urban inputs to water quality from sources such as road salt and fertilizer. As part of an interdisciplinary effort within the iUTAH project, multiple synoptic surveys were performed and a variety of measurements were made, including basic water chemistry along with discharge, water isotopes, and nutrients.

Red Butte Creek, a stream in Salt Lake City, does not show significant urban impact to water quality until several kilometers after it enters the city where concentrations of solutes such as chloride and nitrate more than triple in a gaining reach. Groundwater springs discharging to this gaining section demonstrate urban-impacted water chemistry, suggesting that during baseflow a contaminated alluvial aquifer significantly controls stream chemistry. By combining hydrometric and hydrochemical observations we were able to estimate that these groundwater springs were 17-20% urban runoff. We were then able to predict the chemistry of urban runoff that feeds into the alluvial aquifer. Samples collected from storm culverts, roofs, and asphalt during storms had chemistry values within the range of those predicted by the mixing model. This evidence that urbanization affects the water quality of baseflow through impacted groundwater suggests that stormwater mitigation may not be sufficient for protecting urban watersheds, and quantifying these persistent groundwater mediated impacts is necessary to evaluate the success of restoration efforts. By comparing these results from Red Butte Creek with similar studies from other rivers in the Wasatch Front and other alluvial systems, we can quantify how characteristics such as discharge patterns and land-use determine alluvial recharge controls on surface water quality.

Moderators
avatar for Karen Nichols

Karen Nichols

Water Resource Engineer, HDR, Inc.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Gabor

Rachel Gabor

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Utah
Rachel Gabor is a postdoctoral research fellow with iUTAH at the University of Utah. She studies the hydrology and biogeochemistry of watersheds and is currently focused on understanding how urban systems impact water quality.



Tuesday November 15, 2016 9:55am - 10:20am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

10:25am

Groundwater Development and Surface Water: Streamflow Depletion
Groundwater Development and Surface Water: Streamflow Depletion
Groundwater and surface-water resources are often connected. Much has been written about the effects of groundwater development on surface water, and new tools are available to simulate and quantify these effects. In this study, a numerical groundwater flow model was used to prepare capture maps to illustrate the connection between groundwater development and surface water. Capture maps show the amount of surface-water depletion caused by a well at any location in the model domain and can be used by water managers to assess the impacts of groundwater development. The first part of this presentation gives a brief synopsis of the source of water to wells and common misconceptions about surface-water depletion. The second part presents the development and analysis of capture maps for a basin dominated by surface-water features. Rather than analyzing depletion in only one river or spring, this work uses one set of capture simulations to determine the effects of groundwater development on 11 segments along two rivers, 30 springs, 13 areas of field drains, and 3 areas of evapotranspiration of groundwater. The presentation concludes with a discussion of the implications of the capture maps and suggestions on how this type of analysis can be used by water managers.

Moderators
avatar for Austin White

Austin White

Field Technician, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration

Speakers
LB

Lynette Brooks

Hydrologist, USGS Utah Water Science Center
Lynette Brooks, PE, has a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering and has been a hydrologist with the USGS for 28 years. In that time, she has been part of 10 hydrologic studies of Utah valleys and the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system, which covers an area of about 110,000 square miles. She has completed or is currently working on a total of 8 groundwater modelling projects in support of those studies.


Tuesday November 15, 2016 10:25am - 10:50am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

10:25am

Water Quality Summary of the Jordan River Watershed
Water Quality Summary of the Jordan River Watershed
The Jordan River watershed is part of the Great Salt Lake Basin draining from Utah Lake and terminating at the Great Salt Lake 51 miles to the north. Major water uses in the area include municipal and industrial uses, agriculture, irrigation, and recreation. Much of the water in the watershed is diverted for consumptive uses supporting a population of over a million residents. Tributaries to the Jordan River from both the east and west are situated within a complex network of diversions, return flows, and stormwater discharges resulting in a variety of water quality concerns. This presentation will provide an overview of these water quality concerns along with ongoing remediation efforts, such as Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and watershed plans, to restore their beneficial uses. While past management of the watershed focused on water development and flood control programs, future management will need to concentrate efforts on the continual need to develop and preserve high levels of water quality in the Jordan River watershed.

Moderators
avatar for Karen Nichols

Karen Nichols

Water Resource Engineer, HDR, Inc.

Speakers
SW

Sandy Wingert

Environmental Scientist, Utah Division of Water Quality
Sandy Wingert is an Environmental Scientist who has worked for the Utah Division of Water Quality for past 9 years. She got her Master’s degree in Environmental Health from the University of South Carolina. For the State, she is charged with all things related to water quality in both the Upper Provo River and Jordan River watersheds. She assesses waterbodies to determine if they are polluted, and if so then develops a restoration plan. She... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 10:25am - 10:50am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:00am

Do Microbes of the Jordan River, Utah, Yo-Yo Diet?
Do Microbes of the Jordan River, Utah, Yo-Yo Diet?
The Jordan River, a 58-mile, 4th order urban river traversing the Salt Lake Valley from Utah Lake to the Great Salt Lake, suffers from low dissolved oxygen, periods of high water temperature, and loading of organic matter and nutrients. Elevated temperature and abundant energy and nutrients stimulate microbial respiration, which consumes oxygen. We are studying microbial community response to potential variation in temperature and the supply of energy and nutrients at twelve locations along the river in order to better understand whether different management actions are appropriate at certain locations or timepoints. Variation in temperature and resource supply may occur as a result of discharge from from point sources (i.e., water reclamation facilities and tributaries) and seasonal change in hydrology or autotroph production. We are measuring water chemistry and quantifying elemental content ratios, stable isotope signatures, and fluorometry of organic matter from the water column and sediments to infer the source of organic matter and its quality. We also are assessing rates of microbial ecoenzyme expression associated with the acquisition of nutrients or carbon to infer whether microbial communities exhibit maximum rates of activity or if they are limited by energy or nutrients. We present preliminary study results summarized after two of our three sampling campaigns, planned for spring, mid-summer, and late fall of 2016. Our sampling efforts occurred before (late May) and during (early August) the harmful algal bloom (HAB) that afflicted the Jordan River this year.

Moderators
avatar for Alex Hamilton

Alex Hamilton

Hydrologic Technician, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration
My name is Alex Hamilton. I've been with Salt Lake County for almost 10 years. When I'm not splashing around in the streams measuring flow or taking water quality samples I enjoy spending time with my family and collecting exotic reptiles and amphibians.

Speakers
MN

Michael Navidomskis

Student, University of Utah
Michael (Mickey) Navidomskis is an undergraduate student majoring in Civil Engineering and minoring in Environmental & Sustainability Studies at the University of Utah. He is a research technician who also is conducting independent research on nitrogen dynamics of the Jordan River under the supervision of Dr. Rose Smith in the the Department of Biology.
avatar for Jennifer Follstad Shah

Jennifer Follstad Shah

Assistant Professor (Lecturer) / Assistant Research Professor, University of Utah, Department of Geography
Dr. Jennifer Follstad Shah is an Assistant Professor (Lecturer) in the Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVST) Program and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Utah. She also is affiliated faculty of the Global Change and Sustainability Center and the iUTAH Program. Jennifer is a freshwater ecosystem ecologist whose research examines the effects of global change (rising temperature, altered... Read More →
RS

Rose Smith

University of Utah, Biology Department
Rose Smith received her Ph.D in Geology from the University of Maryland and B.A. from Mount Holyoke College. For her PhD dissertation, Rose examined the role of urban stormwater and sanitary infrastructure on carbon and nitrogen loading as well as greenhouse gas emissions from streams in Baltimore, MD. | | Rose is currently a postdoctoral fellow examining nitrogen sources in human-impacted waterways with Gabe Bowen and Diane Pataki at the... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 11:00am - 11:25am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:00am

Quantifying Interactions of Climate and Landscape on Water Resources
Quantifying Interactions of Climate and Landscape on Water Resources
Growing populations and a changing climate are creating an uncertain future for water resources in the Western United States, including Salt Lake City and all of Utah. Planning for future population and climate conditions requires quantifying differential sensitivity of hydrologic partitioning to changes in climate. To address this challenge we ask: How do landscape characteristics influence the partitioning of precipitation into streamflow and plant available water along the Wasatch Front? And can historical observations of climate and streamflow provide inferences to the differential sensitivity of local watersheds to changes in climate?

The seven watersheds along the Wasatch Front (City Creek, Red Butte, Emigration, Parley’s, Millcreek, Big Cottonwood, and Little Cottonwood) provide an excellent research area to answer these questions. These watersheds are not only important to the Salt Lake area, providing over half of its water supply, but also have over 100 years of climate and streamflow response data to study the how the water balance is influenced by landscape. Additionally, there are many landscape differences between the watersheds: ranging in size from 19 km2 to 127 km2, in mean elevation from 1960 m to 2610 m, in mean slope steepness from 20° to 27°, in predominant slope aspect either north-facing or south-facing, in the type of soils present, and in the predominant bedrock geology.

Mean annual precipitation (790 mm to 1290 mm) and temperature (3.3°C to 6.9°C) vary primarily as a function of catchment elevation. Between 1900 and 2014 the average annual temperature across all watersheds has increased by 0.91°C, with most of the change occurring during the last fifty years. During the same time there has been no significant change in the amount of annual precipitation. Mean annual streamflow, normalized by catchment area, ranges from 150 mm to 820 mm with annual precipitation explaining between 43%-72% of the annual variability in streamflow. Surprisingly, the remaining variability is not correlated to annual or seasonal temperature even though the catchments have experienced notable warming. Instead, inter-annual variability in streamflow and water yield is significantly related to the rate of snow melt and the amount of subsurface storage in the watershed (derived from winter baseflow) in addition to the amount of annual precipitation. Specifically, higher antecedent baseflow and faster snowmelt both result in a preferential partitioning of precipitation to streamflow. This implies that the effects of a warming climate on the water resources of the seasonally snow dominated watersheds near Salt Lake City can be best understood through the context of the melting snowpack. Further, climate extremes, such as inter-annual drought, may leave a legacy effect on the subsurface storage in some watersheds, causing a delayed streamflow recovery in the years following the drought.

Moderators
AB

Anthony Berceau

Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration

Speakers
AG

Andrew Gelderloos

Graduate Student, University of Utah
Andrew Gelderloos is a master’s student studying water resources in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. His research seeks to understand climate and landscape interactions that influence partitioning of precipitation in seasonally snow dominated watersheds in order to understand watershed sensitivity to future climate change and water supply demands.



Tuesday November 15, 2016 11:00am - 11:25am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:30am

Water Losses in SLC During Warm, Dry Years!
Water Losses in SLC During Warm, Dry Years!
Water is a critical resource for human development, economic well-being, and sustainability. Growing population and expanding agricultural activities have made water extraction for anthropogenic use a major flux in the hydrological cycle. In order to successfully meet the rising demands, water managers have resorted to over-exploitation of regional surface water resources, large scale inter-basin transfer, and extraction from subsurface aquifers making sustainable water management practices a major challenge, thus endangering water availability for our future generations.The severity of these effects, and the need to better understand connections between climate, water extraction, water use, and water use impacts, is strongest in areas of climatic aridity and substantial land-use change, such as the rapidly urbanizing areas of Utah. To understand these connections, we collected and analyzed stable isotopic ratios of more than 800 urban tap water samples in a series of semiannual water surveys (spring and fall, 2013 to 2015) across the Salt Lake Valley (SLV) of northern Utah. We observed strong and structured spatiotemporal variation in tap water isotopic compositions across the region which we attribute to complex distribution systems, varying water management practices and multiple sources used across the valley.

Isotopic mass balance indicated significant inter- and intra-annual variability in water losses within the distribution network due to evaporation from surface water resources supplying the SLV. Our calculation suggests that evaporative losses from the SLV water supply increased from 1 - 1.5% of the total water flux in 2013 to 4 - 6% in 2015. Using yearly water consumption data for the SLV obtained from the Utah Division of Water Rights, these values translate into > 4 million gallons of evaporative loss per day in 2015. This enhanced loss to the atmosphere would equate to $2.25 million of revenue loss in 2015 (calculated at current rates of $1.16 per unit within Salt Lake City; 1 unit = 748 gallons) if translated into reduced extractions, or significant ecological impacts if extraction remained unchanged.

Our isotopic assessment highlights aspects of the municipal water systems supplying the SLV that are germane to planning for and understanding these future water resource challenges. Our calculations show significant increase in evaporative losses within the system over the three-year sampling period, likely attributable to the atypically warm and dry weather that persisted throughout the study. Given that majority of municipal water used within the SLV is currently sourced from surface water and the proposed development of water resources to satisfy future demands associated with population growth focuses primarily on surface water systems of the Central Utah Project and Bear River, SLV communities are and will continue to have strong exposure to changes in evaporative losses from these systems.

Moderators
AB

Anthony Berceau

Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration

Speakers
avatar for Yusuf Jameel

Yusuf Jameel

University of Utah
Yusuf Jameel is a PhD candidate working with Dr. Gabe Bowen, at the department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah studying urban and natural water systems. He has been analyzing the connections between human population, climate, water extraction, water use, and water use impacts, in regions of climatic aridity and extensive land-use change, such as rapidly urbanizing areas across the western United States of America (USA). Using stable... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:30am

You Can’t Play Soccer in a Perennial Bed!
You Can’t Play Soccer in a Perennial Bed!
Turfgrasses are unique plants in how they grow, how they are managed, what people expect of them, and especially how they are used in urban landscapes. Most people are not aware of their role, but turf is very important to the sustainability and quality of life in urban areas throughout the world. While often misunderstood, people come in contact with turfgrasses constantly, providing recreation and cultural benefits including improved physical and mental health. As living plant systems, turfgrasses are highly adaptable, do not require the inputs many people believe (especially water), and protect and build soils. Their role in urban areas in many ways is increasing in importance with heavier use and higher demands. In this presentation, we will discuss the unique roles that turfgrasses play in urban landscapes, that literally no other type of plant can deliver. We will also discuss the diversity of grasses that could be used, several misconceptions about their management, and summarize attributes that make them an important component of sustainable water-conserving landscapes.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson

Professor and Department Head, Utah State University
Paul Johnson been studying turfgrasses his entire career, starting as an assistant golf course superintendent, and then in research at the University of Minnesota where he earned his PhD, at the University of Nebraska, and for the last 18 yrs. at Utah State University. His research and teaching with these little plants has been focused on understanding their biology and ecology. That knowledge has been applied to plant breeding efforts in... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:05pm

Starts With a BBQ: Aligning Citizens with Utah Monitoring Needs
Starts With a BBQ: Aligning Citizens with Utah Monitoring Needs
More than 20 of our most dedicated Utah Water Watch volunteers gathered this summer to share the story of why they monitor at the first annual volunteer get-together in Salt Lake City.

Now in its fifth year, Utah Water Watch -- Utah’s citizen water quality monitoring network – is expanding and adapting its programs, providing volunteers with moer advanced monitoring opportunities. We are finding new ways to support our existing network of over 100 volunteers while addressing Utah’s unique monitoring needs. In this session, we will show how our volunteers are working with watershed partners and scientists to improve the water quality and safety of Utah's rivers, lakes and streams. We have learned that volunteers want to know how their data is used, so forming these connections between volunteers and scientists is critical to the success of our program.

We will be discussing how improvements to the Tier 2 volunteer network and coordination with watershed partners can advance statewide water quality goals. Partners benefit from an extra hand in the field and volunteers learn about local water quality issues while assisting with implementation and monitoring of restoration projects.

We will also address our plan to expand lake monitoring, especially for harmful algal blooms and E. coli, to help keep Utah’s waters and swimming beaches safe. Volunteers monitor many of the swimming beaches and lakes in many rural areas that are often beyond the reach of state and local agencies. Utah Water Watch is working closely with the Utah Lakes and Reservoirs program as well as partners such as the State Parks in developing our protocol and network.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Bailey

Ellen Bailey

Program Coordinator, USU Water Quality Extension
Ellen Bailey is program coordinator for USU Water Quality Extension, providing outreach and engaging teachers, students and citizens to become stewards of their water. She received a Biology Degree from University of Dayton and MS in Soil and Water Science from University of Florida. While collecting biological and water quality data in Florida for nine years was an excellent experience, she enjoys working in Utah to protect our water resources.
ER

Eli Robinson

AmericCorps Intern, USU Water Quality Extension
Eli Robinson is an AmeriCorps Intern with USU Water Quality Extension. He assists with program coordination of Utah Water Watch and education programs and enjoys working to move the program in new directions. He received a Biology Degree from Whitman College in Washington.



Tuesday November 15, 2016 12:05pm - 12:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:05pm

Jordan River Valley & Water Resources Status in the 2040s & 2090s
Jordan River Valley & Water Resources Status in the 2040s & 2090s
One of the major challenges faced by local municipal authorities and regulators in the US is developing a future implementation plan to protect water availability (i.e., water quantity and quality) and attain Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) considering uncertain future change drivers including climate change, land use changes, population growth and other water management practices.

In this presentation, we consider a case study of the Jordan River and its tributaries, a watershed which encompasses mountainous headwaters that supply water to a highly urbanized valley with irrigation canals, stormwater and treated wastewater return flows. We present our research findings in four areas by a group of multidisciplinary experts on: (a) Climate change and climate variability: what are the major climatic parameters that will have significant changes in their magnitude, and how will these changes in climate impact water resources in the Jordan valley? (b) Land use and land cover changes in Jordan valley: (i) how will land use and land cover change in the valley based on socio-economic drivers? (ii) How land use and land cover will change in the valley if we consider Wasatch Choice 2040 – the shared regional vision established by Wasatch Front communities? (c) Hydrological impact: (i) what will be the impact of the climate change and land use on water availability in creeks that are the major sources of water supply for the valley? (d) Water quality impact: (i) what will be the impact of future climate, land use changes and population growth on nutrient loading and dissolved oxygen levels in different sections of the Jordan River.

The results are based on our coupled modeling work: (i) dynamically downscaled regional climate model (Weather Research and Forecasting; WRF) output at 4-km horizontal resolution and hourly time step covering Utah State for 1985 to 2010, and in the decades of 2040s and 2090s; (ii) A probabilistic equilibrium land use model for 2040, and the regional land use vision embodied in in Wasatch Choice 2040; (iv) The HSPF model (Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran) - calibrated and validated based on the stream flow data available from 1993 to 2006, and simulated for decades 2040s and 2090s considering the future changes.

This body of research is an example of integrated and coupled modeling for watershed science in the face of variability, uncertainty and complexity. This holistic modeling approach and results will be helpful in analyzing water availability and water quality in Jordan River Valley for periods of time to the end of the current century, and will support development of rational watershed plans to protect vulnerable water resources.

Keywords: Climate change; land use change; watershed modeling; water availability; Total Maximum Daily Load.

Moderators
avatar for Carly Hansen

Carly Hansen

PhD Candidate, University of Utah
Carly is a PhD Candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah, working in the Urban Water Research Group under the direction of Dr. Steven Burian.

Speakers
MB

Martin Buchert

Senior Research Analyst, University of Utah
Martin Buchert has a Master’s degree in Geography from the University of Hawaiʻi at Manōa and subsequently studied ecology and remote sensing at Utah State University (no degree). Following school, Martin spent four years in the private sector as a NEPA Planner with H.W. Lochner, during which time he joined the University of Utah’s City and Metropolitan Planning Department as Assistant Adjunct Professor, where he continues to teach GIS... Read More →
KK

Krishna Khatri

Research Assistant Professor, University of Utah, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Krishna Khatri is a Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Utah. Krishna received his PhD in Water Resources Engineering (in the area of risk and uncertainty analysis) from Delft Technical University, Netherlands; MSc in Integrated Urban Water Engineering from UNESCO-IHE, Netherlands; MPA in development study and BE in Civil Engineering from Tribhuvan University, Nepal. He has more... Read More →
NV

Nicholas von Stackelberg

Environmental Engineer, Utah Division of Water Quality
Nicholas von Stackelberg is an environmental engineer with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Nicholas has worked on water resources and water quality projects for twenty years with several consulting firms and governmental agencies in Seattle and Salt Lake City. In his current position with the Division of Water Quality, he is responsible for water quality modeling to support discharge permitting, total maximum daily load studies... Read More →
CS

Court Strong

University of Utah, Department of Atmospheric Science
Dr. Court Strong is an Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Utah. He is an expert in the simulation and analysis of climate dynamics with special interest in the cryosphere (the frozen portion of the climate system including mountain snowpack). He is co-principal investigator on the $20M iUTAH project focusing on water and climate in Utah, and he led high resolution modeling of climate... Read More →


Tuesday November 15, 2016 12:05pm - 1:00pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:35pm

What Really Inspires Stewardship? A Case Against Scare Tactics
What Really Inspires Stewardship? A Case Against Scare Tactics
Have you encountered someone who cares about the environment but thinks the issues are too big for them to do anything about? Recent research indicates that this type of attitude may stem from being exposed to serious environmental issues at a young age; for instance, a five year old learning an animal might die from entanglement in litter. Whether you consider yourself an educator or not, most of us interact with the public in various forums and have the opportunity to help curb this issue. In recent years a movement has developed that encourages educators to consider age appropriate messages and shy away from messages of fear, instead focusing on messages of positive behavior change. In this session we will present David Sobel’s idea of “ecophobia” and how it informs Tracy Aviary’s education programs. We will discuss appropriate topics for different age groups and ask audience members to share ideas for how this concept might affect their work or programming.

Moderators
avatar for Alex Hamilton

Alex Hamilton

Hydrologic Technician, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration
My name is Alex Hamilton. I've been with Salt Lake County for almost 10 years. When I'm not splashing around in the streams measuring flow or taking water quality samples I enjoy spending time with my family and collecting exotic reptiles and amphibians.

Speakers
MM

Michelle Mileham

Directof of Education, Tracy Aviary
Michelle Mileham is the Director of Education at Tracy Aviary in Salt Lake City. Prior to moving to Utah, Michelle was a graduate student at Oregon State University where she finished her Master’s and Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences and Education with a specific focus on museum education. She is interested in how museums use storytelling to understand their visitors, staff, and volunteers and studies how to provide the most engaging... Read More →
avatar for Anne Terry

Anne Terry

Education Manager, Tracy Aviary
Anne Terry is Education Manager at Tracy Aviary. She got her start in environmental education by volunteering at a zoo in Texas at the age of thirteen and quickly realized it was the field for her. She has a B.S. in Biology from the University of Texas. An internship with the City of Austin Watershed Protection Department introduced her to watershed education, and in her four years at Tracy Aviary, she has enjoyed finding new ways to connect... Read More →


Tuesday November 15, 2016 12:35pm - 1:00pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

1:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday November 15, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

2:00pm

Poster Session
Dedicated poster session where presenters will be on hand to answer questions and discuss their posters.

Speakers
SA

Shoeleh Assemi

President, Imessa Research LLC
MA

Marina Astin

Educator, Tracy Aviary
Marina Astin is an educator at Tracy Aviary. She graduated from Brigham Young University with a B.S. in Biology and a minor in Environmental Science. As an intern at Tracy Aviary she was introduced to environmental education. Marina works with Tracy Aviary’s Nature in the City program, providing fun, educational activities to get families outdoors exploring nature. She has especially loved getting to explore Salt Lake’s river and streams.
LB

Lynette Brooks

Hydrologist, USGS Utah Water Science Center
Lynette Brooks, PE, has a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering and has been a hydrologist with the USGS for 28 years. In that time, she has been part of 10 hydrologic studies of Utah valleys and the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system, which covers an area of about 110,000 square miles. She has completed or is currently working on a total of 8 groundwater modelling projects in support of those studies.
EC

Eddy Cadet

Associate Professor, Utah Valley University
Eddy is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth Science at UVU. He started at UVU (formerly UVSC) in 1993. Eddy specializes in teaching Introduction to Environmental Health, Occupational Worker Safety, Hazardous Materials and Emergency Response, Hazardous Materials Regulations, Environmental Toxicology, Resource Conservation and Recovery, Site Investigation, Landuse Planning, Environmental Compliance, and Environmental Management.
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Cynthia Elliott

Undergraduate Student, Weber State University
Cynthia Elliott is an undergraduate student, studying Geography at Weber State University. Her love for the earth was brought out as a 4th grader in Southern California, when her class went for a week long science field-trip in the mountains to learn about ecosystems. She loves learning about weather and climates, rocks and minerals, ecosystems, art, music, and statistics. Cynthia plans on applying for graduate school in the near future. When she... Read More →
AE

Arthur Evensen

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Utah Valley University
Undergraduate research assistant working under the mentorship and supervision of Dr. Eddy Cadet, PhD
avatar for Rachel Gabor

Rachel Gabor

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Utah
Rachel Gabor is a postdoctoral research fellow with iUTAH at the University of Utah. She studies the hydrology and biogeochemistry of watersheds and is currently focused on understanding how urban systems impact water quality.
AG

Andrew Gelderloos

Graduate Student, University of Utah
Andrew Gelderloos is a master’s student studying water resources in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. His research seeks to understand climate and landscape interactions that influence partitioning of precipitation in seasonally snow dominated watersheds in order to understand watershed sensitivity to future climate change and water supply demands.
RG

Ramesh Goel

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He obtained his PhD from South Carolina and post doctoral training form the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was a visiting professor at EAWAG aquatic institute in Switzerland. He is currently serving as an associate editor of Water Research and Water Environment Research
avatar for Brittany Van Grouw

Brittany Van Grouw

Graduate Student, University of Utah
Brittany is a Master's student under Dr. Michael Barber at the University of Utah. While finishing her thesis, she is working part time as a Water/Wastewater Engineer at AECOM. She moved out to Utah from the east coast two years ago and is continually enthused with learning more about water in Utah.
avatar for Stacy Henderson

Stacy Henderson

iUtah iFellow/Student, iUtah/Salt Lake Community College
Stacy is a Geology major attending SLCC/ Westminster. She plans to get her Bachelor's degree in Geology and Master's degree in Hydrology/Hydrogeology. Over the summer she interned with iUtah in their policy/environment research focus area. She is interested in water use and conservation. In her free time she likes to mountain bike, hike, and camp with her dogs and husband.
DK

David Kimberly

Assistant Professor, Westminster College
Dr. David A. Kimberly is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Westminster College. With a background in environmental toxicology, a central goal of his research is to understand the role anthropogenic (human caused) stressors play in shaping components of natural ecosystems. Specifically, he considers anthropogenic stress in a larger context of stress in general and to examine interactive effects such as predators, climate change, habitat... Read More →
MM

Mallory Millington

Graduate Student, University of Utah
Mallory Millington is a 2nd year Master's student at the University of Utah. She studies the influence of urban land use and runoff affects water quality in a semi-arid mountain environment.
MN

Michael Navidomskis

Student, University of Utah
Michael (Mickey) Navidomskis is an undergraduate student majoring in Civil Engineering and minoring in Environmental & Sustainability Studies at the University of Utah. He is a research technician who also is conducting independent research on nitrogen dynamics of the Jordan River under the supervision of Dr. Rose Smith in the the Department of Biology.
AN

Alexis Nelson

Student, Westminster College
Alexis Nelson is a Biology/Pre-med student at Westminster College.
SO

Scott Olsen

Imessa Research
avatar for Jennifer Follstad Shah

Jennifer Follstad Shah

Assistant Professor (Lecturer) / Assistant Research Professor, University of Utah, Department of Geography
Dr. Jennifer Follstad Shah is an Assistant Professor (Lecturer) in the Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVST) Program and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Utah. She also is affiliated faculty of the Global Change and Sustainability Center and the iUTAH Program. Jennifer is a freshwater ecosystem ecologist whose research examines the effects of global change (rising temperature, altered... Read More →
RS

Rose Smith

University of Utah, Biology Department
Rose Smith received her Ph.D in Geology from the University of Maryland and B.A. from Mount Holyoke College. For her PhD dissertation, Rose examined the role of urban stormwater and sanitary infrastructure on carbon and nitrogen loading as well as greenhouse gas emissions from streams in Baltimore, MD. | | Rose is currently a postdoctoral fellow examining nitrogen sources in human-impacted waterways with Gabe Bowen and Diane Pataki at the... Read More →
BT

Brian Tonetti

Co-Director & Founder, Seven Canyons Trust
Brian Tonetti is the Co-Director, as well as a founder of the Seven Canyons Trust. He is also the Program and Policy Planner at the Jordan River Commission. He graduated from the University of Utah with a BS in Environmental and Sustainability Studies and Urban Planning.
CW

Cora Winters

Student, Westminster College
Cora Winters is a Biology/Pre-vet student at Westminster College
JW

Jake Wood

Undergraduate B.S., Utah Valley University
Undergraduate research assistant working under the mentorship and supervision of Dr. Eddy Cadet, PhD
AY

Annie Young

Educator, Tracy Aviary
Annie Young is an educator at Tracy Aviary. Having studied at the University of Portland, she received her B.A. in International Languages and Culture focusing on Spanish, along with double minors in Biology and Chemistry. She found her passion for environmental education through an internship at Tracy Aviary focusing on education about watersheds, riparian habitats, and water conservation. In her free time Annie enjoys creating ceramic... Read More →


Tuesday November 15, 2016 2:00pm - 2:55pm
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:05pm

Diverse Perspectives on Water from the Salt Lake Watershed
Diverse Perspectives on Water from the Salt Lake Watershed
Utah is experiencing rapid growth and socio-economic change. When you couple this growth with the fact that Utah is the second driest state in the nation, it is clear that there are a number of critical water resource challenges facing the state. As Utah’s major metropolitan area, the Salt Lake Watershed faces these salient water challenges, and better understanding of diverse perspectives on water issues is integral to effective water governance in coming years. This presentation draws on findings from multiple research efforts conducted by the iUTAH water project to ascertain the level of alignment among water related perspectives across different communities, groups, and vantage points. The iUTAH (innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-sustainability) Project is a federally funded effort designed to build capacity to understand Utah’s mountain-metro water system and provide key information to decision makers.

iUTAH social science research prioritizes the assessment of diverse perspectives on water. Interviews conducted with both professional and public stakeholders illuminate an array of water attitudes and experiences. While there is some common ground, this assessment highlights disconnections that may make setting and implementing local water priorities challenging. A more scientific-oriented discourse was found among professionals who portrayed more complex understanding of water systems. The more abstract discussions of water among public stakeholders who drew upon more personal experiences and observations reveal that public priorities do not always align with the same level of specificity as those articulated by local leaders and resource managers. These findings on how various stakeholders articulate water related issues are key to understanding collaborative potential within and across the Salt Lake Watershed. Concerns about water supply and infrastructure in light of growing populations and climate change, varying local experiences with water quality incidents and flooding hazards, and maintaining highly-valued water recreation opportunities are all part of water-related discourse across the Salt Lake Watershed.

Speakers
avatar for Kent Dean

Kent Dean

Graduate Student, Utah State University
My name is Kent Taylor Dean and I grew up in Riverton, Utah. I am attending graduate school at Utah State University in the Sociology department. I love the outdoors and try and spend as much time as I can camping and traveling.



Tuesday November 15, 2016 3:05pm - 3:30pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:05pm

Environmental Dashboard: Tracking the Health of the Wasatch
Environmental Dashboard: Tracking the Health of the Wasatch
The Environmental Dashboard will be a tool for the public and decision makers to track the environmental health of the Central Wasatch and evaluate impacts in future planning discussions. It is the intention of the Mountain Accord that the Dashboard is a legacy project and will be updated on a regular basis. It will be scientifically based, data rich, and technically credible. Step I of the Dashboard is in progress and will compile data currently collected throughout the Central Wasatch Mountains in a way that provides a picture of the complete health of the mountain range, as well as a mechanism for measuring the health moving forward. Step II of the Dashboard will include an online connection for people interested in tracking the progress of key indicators.

This presentation gives an overview of the development of the Dashboard and where we are today.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Degiorgio

Joan Degiorgio

The Nature Conservancy
Joan Degiorgio has been working in the field of natural resources planning for over 30 years. These years have included planning positions with the State of Utah, U.S. Forest Service, private consulting, and the Utah Mitigation Commission. She is a Utah native raised on a farm in Weber County, with a law degree from the University of Utah. She has also been an adjunct professor at the University of Utah teaching a public land and planning course... Read More →
avatar for Marian Hubbard-Rice

Marian Hubbard-Rice

Water Quality & Treatment Administrator, Salt Lake City Public Utilities
Marian Hubbard-Rice is the Water Quality & Treatment Administrator for Salt Lake City Public Utilities. Before joining Salt Lake City, Marian was the Watershed Section Manager for Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology and MPA in Natural Resource Management from University of Utah. She is currently working on a Ph.D. at University of Utah focusing on the energy-water nexus, which... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 3:05pm - 3:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:35pm

Provo River Delta Restoration: Suckers, Rollerblading, and More!
Provo River Delta Restoration: Suckers, Rollerblading, and More!
Although the Provo River is not located within Salt Lake County, it serves as a major drinking water source for Salt Lake County residents. It is also the largest tributary to Utah Lake, which feeds Salt Lake County’s largest river. Since European settlement in the 1800’s, both Utah Lake and the Provo River have been affected by water development and river management projects involving the construction of dams, water diversions, pipelines, dikes, and pumping systems. These alterations to the river and lake ecosystem have impacted the endangered June sucker (Chasmistes liorus) which occurs naturally only in Utah Lake and spawns primarily in Provo River.

As recent water development projects have been planned and constructed, commitments have been made to aid in the recovery of the June sucker. The Provo River Delta Restoration Project (PRDRP) will address several of these commitments by restoring a more natural delta ecosystem essential for a healthy June sucker population. Currently, June sucker recruitment is severely limited in part because of degraded rearing habitat. The PRDRP will redirect the lower 1.5 miles of the lower Provo River channel into a restored delta while still preserving the existing lower river channel as a recreational amenity. The delta restoration will remove artificial levees, re-connect the river and lake with adjacent wetlands, restore natural fluvial processes and ecological conditions, and re-establish and reconnect habitats. Restored rearing habitat will support juvenile June sucker until they are capable of surviving in the larger open water environment of Utah Lake.

Another major component of the PRDRP will be to enhance and expand recreation opportunities in the area. Currently, the Provo River Parkway Trail along the lower existing river channel receives heavy recreational use for activities including fishing, rollerblading, jogging, and biking. The PRDRP includes commitments to preserve and enhance the recreation experience along the existing lower river channel by providing minimum instream flows and installing an aeration system to improve water quality. The PRDRP will also develop new trailheads, viewing towers, and additional trails around the restored delta area. These recreation features are being designed in close coordination with numerous stakeholders including Utah County, Provo City, and Utah Lake State Park.

The PRDRP is a joint effort of the June Sucker Recovery Implementation Program, the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission, the U.S. Department of Interior's Central Utah Project Completion Act Office, and the Central Utah Water Conservancy District. A Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision were published for the project in April and May of 2015, respectively. Currently, property for the project is in the process of being acquired and detailed designs for the delta area and various recreation features are being developed. Project construction is anticipated to begin in 2018.

This presentation will familiarize listeners with the PRDRP, highlight the watershed connections between Provo River and Salt Lake County, and provide insights into the complexities and groundwork involved in implementing large-scale restoration projects.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Stamp

Melissa Stamp

Project Coordinator, Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission
Melissa Stamp has worked as a Project Coordinator for the Mitigation Commission since November 2015. Prior to joining the Commission, she worked as an Education Assistant at Red Butte Garden developing educational mobile games, teaching summer camps, and leading school field trips. Ms. Stamp also spent many years as an environmental consultant working on various water resource projects in Salt Lake County and beyond. She holds an M.S. in... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 3:35pm - 4:00pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:35pm

Water is for Fighting! Water Right Adjudications in Salt Lake Valley
Water is for Fighting! Water Right Adjudications in Salt Lake Valley
As competing demands over water resources within the Salt Lake Valley continue to grow, the urgency for clarity and certainty in the realm of water rights likewise becomes more critical. Having evolved over time--commensurate with the history of Utah--present-day water rights take many shapes and forms. Consequently, questions of supplemental relationships, pre-statutory rights, forfeiture, and Federal Reserve rights often cloud the overall water rights picture. The General Adjudication process addresses these issues utilizing a unique combination of historical research, "boots-on-the-ground" investigations, and legal proceedings--ultimately providing the public with a clear delineation of the water rights within the Utah Lake and Jordan River watershed.

Speakers
avatar for Blake Bingham

Blake Bingham

Adjudication Program Manager, Utah Division of Water Rights
Blake Bingham is the Adjudication Program Manager at the Utah Division of Water Rights. He joined the State Engineer’s Office in July 201. Mr. Bingham’s current responsibilities include management and supervision of the Division’s water rights general adjudication proceedings throughout the State of Utah. He is currently supervising fourteen separate adjudications located in the Utah Lake/Jordan River, Uintah Basin, Bear River, and Virgin... Read More →



Tuesday November 15, 2016 3:35pm - 4:00pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

4:05pm

Mirage in the Desert: Data Centers, Water Use, & Growth
Mirage in the Desert: Data Centers, Water Use, & Growth
Data centers have a history of generating controversy in Utah, particularly in regard to the water and tax benefits that sustain them. In 2014, the Utah Legislature threatened to cut off the NSA Utah Data Center’s water supply after public records revealed the data center is using more water than its host town of Bluffdale. This year, after weeks of secrecy over its location, the proposed Facebook data center is slated for West Jordan City where it will enjoy millions of dollars in tax breaks and rely on millions of gallons of water per day.

These actions provoke a series of questions this workshop will explore including: Given drought and the high water usage of these data centers, what is the current state of water scarcity in Utah in regard to supply and usage? Do tax policies enable and/or increase their high water consumption? What impacts to our watersheds do these data centers and the practices that sustain them have? We will also examine exactly how much water these data centers use compared to other municipal and agricultural water uses.

Speakers
DM

Darin Mann

Utah Rivers Council
Darin Mann studied English Literature at the University of Utah. He garnered a love for politics and the environment reading theorists and poets like Guy Debord and Robert Frost. His commitment to changing Utah’s politics is only matched by his passion for the forests, rivers and lakes of Utah. When he is not at the office, you can find Darin in the ring getting bruised up by his boxing students or sitting under the shade of his favorite tree... Read More →
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Weston Wood

Conservation Associate, Utah Rivers Council
Weston Wood is currently finishing his H.B.S. in Communication Studies and Political Science at the University of Utah, and is passionate about the intersection of power and ecology in both study and practice. Weston interned with the organization in Fall of 2015 and is thrilled to continue to work on a variety of conservation, research and outreach initiatives at the URC. He grew up getting to know the wonder of Utah’s wild watersheds and is... Read More →


Tuesday November 15, 2016 4:05pm - 4:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

4:05pm

Revealing Intrinsics of Nitrogen Transformation in Green Infrastructure
Revealing Intrinsics of Nitrogen Transformation in Green Infrastructure
Unmitigated rainfall runoff from the impervious surfaces common to urban infrastructure can lead to many environmental problems. Water quality of the surface runoff is degraded because of deposition of various types of pollutants. This load-magnified stormwater discharge does not meet the required discharge quality standards because high levels of nutrients may result in eutrophication or algal blooms. Eutrophication will lead to excessive plant growth thus lowering water-column oxygen levels. Excess levels of nutrients or build-up of toxins may stimulate growth of algal blooms in receiving waterbodies and thereby killing aquatic biota.

Bioretention basins, as stormwater control measures, take advantage of natural environmental processes through incorporation of vegetation and different types of soil media resembling a natural ecosystem. The different layers of soils present in bioretention basins provide an environment favorable for the growth of various microorganisms which help in degrading filtered pollutants like nitrogen and phosphorus. Unfortunately, research has shown that nitrous oxide (N2O) gas which is a potent greenhouse gas is a byproduct of nitrogen removal in soil in both nitrification and denitrification processes. However, very limited research has been done in the direction of understanding the role and abundance of microbial communities involved in the process of nitrogen transformations,and contributes to the release of N2O into the atmosphere from bioretention basins.

During the study, samples were collected from existing bioretention basins located near the University of Utah Campus. Core samples of soil, and composite effluent and influent stormwater samples were collected from the basins and then transported on ice to the laboratory and subsequently analyzed. The results suggest that the quantitative abundance amoA, atypical NosZ, NirK, and NirS gene in all soil samples collected from the bioretention basins during winter are ranging from 1.7×10^6 to 1.7×10^7copies/gm-soil, 1.2×10^6 to 3.1×10^7copies/g-soil, 2.7×10^6 to 3.9×10^8copies/gm-soil, and 3.4×10^7 to 7.4×10^8copies/gm-soil, respectively. Furthermore, results showed lower amoA, NirS and NosZ gene abundance and no amplification of NirK gene in control basin soil samples.
Methods for analyzing phosphorus removal efficiency are being developed. Potential links between emissions of greenhouses gas like N2O and seasonal distribution of microbial communities in bioretention basins with different plant communities are also being observed. Results indicate the presence of AOB strains, Nitrosospira sp. 40KI and Nitrosospira sp. NpAV which have the ability to produce N2O during a nitrifier denitrification process. Moreover, analysis of both winter and summer stormwater samples showed higher concentrations of nitrate in effluent than influent. Further analysis on summer samples and N2Oemissions from each basin are in progress.

The purpose of this research is to comprehend the mechanisms involved in biological nitrogen removal, to explore the contribution of various pathways in N2Oemissions, and understanding microbial ecology for developing a better design of bioretention basin in future which will result in reduced emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

Speakers
RG

Ramesh Goel

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He obtained his PhD from South Carolina and post doctoral training form the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was a visiting professor at EAWAG aquatic institute in Switzerland. He is currently serving as an associate editor of Water Research and Water Environment Research
avatar for Aiswarya Rani Pappu

Aiswarya Rani Pappu

Graduate student, University of Utah
Aiswarya is a graduate student in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah, focusing on Urban green infrastructures and greenhouse gases.


Tuesday November 15, 2016 4:05pm - 4:30pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

7:00pm

Film Screening: "Return of the River"

Join us for the Utah debut of Return of the River, followed by Q&A with director Jessica Plumb! Return of the River chronicles the largest dam removal project in the history of the United States, and the extraordinary effort to restore an ecosystem and set a river free.

Co-hosting thie evening community event is part of an expanded program in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Watershed Symposium! We've partnered with the Utah Film Center to co-host one of their Tuesday night screenings at The City Library.

Admission is free.
Seating is first-come first-served.
Visit the Utah Film Center screening calendar for more info.


The film screening is funded in part by the JRC Large Grants Program, which is administered by the Jordan River Commission and the Utah Division of Forestry Fire and State Lands.


Speakers
avatar for Jessica Plumb

Jessica Plumb

Filmmaker, Plumb Productions
Producer and writer Jessica Plumb is a filmmaker focused on the relationship between people and the places they call home. She moved to the Olympic Peninsula a decade ago, after starting her career in Boston and Beijing. Jessica directs a video production company and has produced numerous educational and promotional videos for clients. She has worked on documentary and narrative films screened at festivals in the role of editor, and behind the... Read More →

Partners
avatar for Jordan River Commission

Jordan River Commission

The Jordan River Commission was created by an Interlocal Cooperation Agreement in August 2010. The JRC was created to facilitate regional implementation of the Blueprint Jordan River, to serve as a technical resource to local communities, and to provide a forum for coordination of planning, restoration, and responsible development along the Jordan River corridor. Current membership includes 14 cities, three counties, six districts, and two... Read More →
avatar for Utah Film Center

Utah Film Center

Utah Film Center inspires and engages diverse audiences to initiate conversation and community building through curated film exhibition, educational programs, and artist support.




Tuesday November 15, 2016 7:00pm - 8:45pm
4_The City Library: Nancy Tessman Auditorium 210 E 400 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84111
 
Wednesday, November 16
 

9:00am

Opening Comments
Speakers
avatar for Robert Thompson

Robert Thompson

Watershed Section Manager, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration
Robert Thompson manages the Salt Lake County Watershed section and is a professionally licensed Geologist in the state of Utah. He specializes in fluvial geomorphology and the restoration of fluvial systems. He has a background in water quality data collection, restoration design, construction and monitoring and education. His outside interests include river running, cycling and trail running.


Wednesday November 16, 2016 9:00am - 9:10am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:10am

KEYNOTE: The Power of Possibility: Birth of a Movement, Rebirth of our Waterways

The Power of Possibility: Birth of a Movement, Rebirth of our Waterways
In this inspirational speech, Yaggi shares a moving story about birth and rebirth, the power of citizen action, and the power of possibility, with a roadmap of how citizens can seize and control the destiny of their communities and waterways around the world. This speech spans from the 1800s to present day in order to paint a picture of our past and foretell a future where engaged citizenry can and must protect their home for future generations.


Speakers
avatar for Marc Yaggi

Marc Yaggi

Executive Director, Waterkeeper Alliance
Marc Yaggi is Executive Director of Waterkeeper Alliance, the largest and fastest growing nonprofit solely focused on clean water. Marc has dedicated his entire career to environmental advocacy and has been instrumental in expanding the Waterkeeper movement around the world for nearly 20 years. Marc leads with a deep, personal passion for clean water and provides organizational leadership by developing strategic partnerships and promoting the... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 9:10am - 9:35am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

9:45am

Beyond the Ivory Tower: University-Stakeholder Partnerships for Utah's Water Future
Beyond the Ivory Tower: University-Stakeholder Partnerships for Utah's Water Future
This panel, composed of representatives from academia and their non-academic partners, will highlight successful university-stakeholder partnerships covering a range of research, education, and outreach efforts on vital water issues in our state.  Using the iUTAH project as an example, panelists will share lessons learned from their successes and failures at bridging the divide between academia and "the real world;" discuss the challenges and rewards of combining practical on-the-ground knowledge, professional expertise, and diverse stakeholder perspectives with basic and applied institutional research; and explore opportunities for new partnerships to advance societally relevant "Science for Utah's Water Future."

Moderators
avatar for Michelle Baker

Michelle Baker

Utah State University / iUTAH EPSCoR
Michelle Baker is a Professor of Biology and an Associate of the Ecology Center at Utah State University. She is also the iUTAH Project Director and Principal Investigator. She holds a B.S. in Biology from Lafayette College and Ph.D. in Biology from the University of New Mexico. Dr. Baker spent a year in Toulouse France on a postdoctoral fellowship before joining the faculty at Utah State University in 1999. Dr. Baker is an ecosystem ecologist... Read More →
avatar for Chris Keleher

Chris Keleher

Recovery Programs Deputy Director, Utah Department of Natural Resources
As Deputy Director of the Recovery Programs Office at DNR, I am responsible for administering the Endangered Species Mitigation Fund - a fund created by the Utah Legislature to aid in the recovery of species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and to conserve non-listed native species in an effort to avoid additional federal listings. My professional background includes work in conservation, research and management in fish biology and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Brunson

Mark Brunson

Professor, Department of Environment and Society, Utah State University
Professor, Department of Environment and Society, Utah State University, and Director for Education, Outreach and Diversity, iUTAH EPSCoR
avatar for Jason Draper

Jason Draper

Engineer, Salt Lake City Public Utilities
Jason Draper has more than fifteen years of experience in environmental and civil engineering with experience in flood plain management, green infrastructure, development review, stormwater program management and water quality regulations. He has been responsible for residential and commercial developments and has experience in reviewing engineering plans, subdivision plat, and capital projects. | | He currently works for Salt Lake... Read More →
avatar for R. Ryan Dupont

R. Ryan Dupont

Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah State University
Dr. Dupont has more than 30 years of experience teaching and conducting applied and basic research in environmental engineering at the Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State University. His main research areas have addressed soil and groundwater bioremediation, field remediation technology demonstration and treatment system performance verification, and more recently, stormwater management via green infrastructure. He currently is PI for... Read More →
LK

Lewis Kogan

Open Space Lands Program Manager, Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands
NV

Nicholas von Stackelberg

Environmental Engineer, Utah Division of Water Quality
Nicholas von Stackelberg is an environmental engineer with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Nicholas has worked on water resources and water quality projects for twenty years with several consulting firms and governmental agencies in Seattle and Salt Lake City. In his current position with the Division of Water Quality, he is responsible for water quality modeling to support discharge permitting, total maximum daily load studies... Read More →
CS

Court Strong

University of Utah, Department of Atmospheric Science
Dr. Court Strong is an Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Utah. He is an expert in the simulation and analysis of climate dynamics with special interest in the cryosphere (the frozen portion of the climate system including mountain snowpack). He is co-principal investigator on the $20M iUTAH project focusing on water and climate in Utah, and he led high resolution modeling of climate... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 9:45am - 10:50am
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:00am

An Integrated Water Resource Management Model for the Great Salt Lake Watershed – Part 2
An Integrated Water Resource Management Model for the Great Salt Lake Watershed – Part 2
Is Great Salt Lake drying up? How might forecasted population and economic growth in Northern Utah change water levels in the lake? How might an extended drought affect the lake? What does that mean to Great Salt Lake’s natural resources, the economic and ecological benefits that are derived from them, and the people who live near its shores? These are all questions the State of Utah has been grappling with that this project hopes to help begin to answer.

A recurring challenge for State regulatory and resource agencies is defining and understanding how variable precipitation and water management in Great Salt Lake’s watershed can influence the lake’s water levels and salinity and subsequently the resources the lake supports. State agencies have not had an effective tool at their disposal that integrates available information to better understand these issues and support sustainable management of Great Salt Lake resources – until now.

At last year’s Symposium, we discussed the need and objectives for an integrated water resources management model. Since then, the project team has been hard at work developing the model and is nearing completion. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the model objectives but will focus upon how the model was developed and will be used. The model should be ready for use by early 2017.

This model will allow State agencies to understand the lake’s drivers of change, understand the potential changes and risks Great Salt Lake and its resources may encounter, incorporate these findings into planning efforts, and sustainably manage the lake’s economic and ecological resources

Moderators
avatar for Joe Donaldson

Joe Donaldson

Sr. Landscape Architect/ Environmental Planner, Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Environmental consulting in public and private sectors for projects throughout the western U.S. Projects have included planning and design for flood control, groundwater recharge, reservoirs, stream corridors, wildlife refuges, and recreation and open space areas and have involved ecological restoration, recreation planning, public use management, visual impact assessment, natural resource planning and management, endangered species protection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jeff DenBleyker

Jeff DenBleyker

Project Manager, CH2M
Jeff has been a project manager and water resources engineer at CH2M in Salt Lake City since 1996. Jeff’s focus is helping form solutions that integrate science with the people and uses that are affected. Jeff led the State’s effort to develop site-specific numeric criteria for selenium for GSL, has been involved with efforts to develop nutrient water quality standards for GSL, and is the State’s project manager the GSL Integrated Water... Read More →
LV

Laura Vernon

Land Use Planner, Utah Division of Forestry, Fire & State Lands
Ms. Vernon, Land Use Planner and the Forest Legacy Coordinator for the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire & State Lands. Over the last 15 years, Laura Burch Vernon has worked with federal, state, and local governments and industry leaders on contemporary planning and environmental policy issues in the West. Her education and professional experience focuses on land use planning, public involvement, socioeconomic analysis, project management, and... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 11:00am - 11:25am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:00am

Who Pulled the Plug on Utah Lake: An Ecological Primer
Who Pulled the Plug on Utah Lake: An Ecological Primer
Utah Lake was perhaps the most ecologically diverse, productive, and awe inspiring lake in the western USA, prior to Mormon settlement in the late 1800’s. Bonneville cutthroat trout and twelve other fish species thrived by the millions. More species of freshwater mollusks called Utah Lake home than anywhere in western North America. Birds, wildlife, and Native Americans thrived. By most accounts, without the incredible bounty that Utah Lake provided, the recently established LDS community likely would have perished. All this abruptly changed at the hands of progress and Utah Lake underwent what is known as a ‘catastrophic ecosystem shift’. Although Utah Lake continues to be highly productive and is sanctuary for thousands of birds; its native fauna has all but disappeared and its waters are now primarily comprised of taxa such as cyanobacteria, algae, zooplankton, worms, midges, and carp. Urbanization is rampant along the shores of Utah Lake, its tributaries run dry for most of the year, and there is no longer a natural connection between Utah Lake and the Jordan River downstream. Utah Lake will never return to what it once was and its time is running out. Utah Lake’s fate is now being decided by political forces that may or may not have its best interests in mind. Citizens need to have a basic understanding of Utah Lake’s incredible ecology and the ecosystem services it provides free of charge to help make informed decisions and to provide guidance to their elected officials and water managers. This presentation will give a brief history of Utah Lake and then focus on its present ecology and food web dynamics including the misunderstood and vastly underappreciated role of mollusks, midges, plankton, and worms.

Moderators
RG

Ramesh Goel

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He obtained his PhD from South Carolina and post doctoral training form the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was a visiting professor at EAWAG aquatic institute in Switzerland. He is currently serving as an associate editor of Water Research and Water Environment Research

Speakers
TM

Theron Miller

Research Scientist, Jordan River/Farmington Bay Water Quality Council
Theron Miller Bio | Education: | BS Wildlife Sciences, Utah State University, a long time ago | BS Aquatic Sciences, Utah State University, a little bit after | MS Aquatic Toxicology, University of Alberta, a couple years after that | PhD Environmental Biology and Ecology, University of Alberta, a few years after that | Career highlights: | Fishery Biologist, US Bureau of Reclamation, Ecological aspects of largemouth bass reproduction in... Read More →
avatar for David Richards

David Richards

Research Ecologist, OreoHelix Consulting
Dr. David Richards has been a research ecologist studying aquatic ecosystems throughout the western hemisphere since time immemorial. Dr. Richards earned a Masters of Science in Entomology, a Masters of Science equivalent in Statistics, and a Ph. D. in Ecology. He has his own successful consulting company OreoHelix Consulting. David reluctantly began studying the ecology of Utah Lake several years ago naively thinking it was just a degraded... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 11:00am - 11:25am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:30am

The Great Salt Lake: Water Not Wasted
The Great Salt Lake: Water Not Wasted
This presentation covers a variety of important issues surrounding Great Salt Lake and the water that feeds it. It covers the purpose of the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program (GSLEP) and demonstrates how we accomplish managing and conserving the avian and aquatic communities of Great Salt Lake. Participants in this talk can expect to learn about the brine shrimp harvest industry and how it is managed by GSLEP. They will learn about the life history of brine shrimp and why they are so important. Participants will also learn about how the millions of birds, people that use the lake for recreation, industries and quality of life in the Salt Lake valley will be affected by lowering lake levels. They will learn about the watershed and why it is very important to continue to allow water to reach Great Salt Lake.

Moderators
avatar for Joe Donaldson

Joe Donaldson

Sr. Landscape Architect/ Environmental Planner, Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Environmental consulting in public and private sectors for projects throughout the western U.S. Projects have included planning and design for flood control, groundwater recharge, reservoirs, stream corridors, wildlife refuges, and recreation and open space areas and have involved ecological restoration, recreation planning, public use management, visual impact assessment, natural resource planning and management, endangered species protection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Kijowski

Ashley Kijowski

Wildlife Biologist II, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
I am a Wildlife Biologist at the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program (GSLEP) within the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR). Here my duties are to develop research questions, prepare study design and conduct research in regards to the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. At GSLEP, we focus on managing the commercial brine shrimp fishery to ensure parity among harvesters and control the harvest to make certain the ecosystem needs are met. I began... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

11:30am

Utah Lake Water Quality Study
Utah Lake Water Quality Study
The Division of Water Quality is conducting a two-phased water quality study on Utah Lake to determine the role of excess nutrients on impairments to the aquatic life and recreational beneficial uses and to determine appropriate nutrient endpoints. An initial water quality investigation was completed in 2007 and subsequently put on hold to evaluation the relationship between in-lake water quality and ongoing ecological management strategies. This presentation will provide an overview of the project, progress to date, overview of ongoing research, and a discussion of the next steps.

DWQ initiated Phase 1 of the Utah Lake study in 2015 in response to nutrient related impairments identified in DWQ’s Integrated Report and in response to harmful algal bloom events on Utah Lake in recent years. Phase 1 of the study consists of four work elements led by DWQ staff and representative stakeholder subcommittees. Phase 1 work elements include: 1) Stakeholder Outreach and Public Involvement; 2) Data and Information Management; 3) Beneficial Use Assessment; 4) Bulk Load Analysis; and 5) Model Selection and Development.

DWQ anticipates completing the majority of the Phase 1 work elements in 2016 and launching a Phase 2 study to identify appropriate nutrient management scenarios. Phase 2 will further investigate water quality conditions in Utah Lake and will result in one of three alternatives: 1) Total Maximum Daily Load; 2) Site Specific Nutrient Criteria; or 3) Use Attainability Analysis.

The water quality model developed in Phase 1 will serve as the primary tool to evaluate the water quality and ecological responses expected from a reduction of nutrient inputs and the carp removal effort. This will require additional research to better understanding of the unique biological, physical, and chemical interactions in the Utah Lake system. DWQ and stakeholders will continue to work collaboratively throughout this study to develop scientifically defensible recommendation for meeting Utah Lake beneficial uses.

Moderators
RG

Ramesh Goel

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He obtained his PhD from South Carolina and post doctoral training form the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was a visiting professor at EAWAG aquatic institute in Switzerland. He is currently serving as an associate editor of Water Research and Water Environment Research

Speakers
SD

Scott Daly

Utah Lake Watershed Coordinator, Utah Division of Water Quality
Scott Daly is the Utah Lake Watershed Coordinator for the Utah Division of Water Quality's Watershed Protection Section. In this role he is involved in a diverse range of activities related to Utah Lake including scientific water quality studies, watershed planning, nonpoint source water quality improvement project implementation, water quality monitoring, and coordination with stakeholders representing many state, local, and private interests... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:05pm

Anthropogenic Impacts on the Utah Lake Ecosystem Using GIS Spatial Analysis
Anthropogenic Impacts on the Utah Lake Ecosystem Using GIS Spatial Analysis
Utah Lake is the largest freshwater lake in the United States west of the Mississippi River. Utah Lake and its surrounding wetlands are critical for fish and wildlife resources, flood mitigation, and recreation. However, the ecosystem is under increasing stress due to urban, industrial, and agricultural runoff from an expanding population that now exceeds 500,000 people in Utah Valley. Different types of land use, such as animal farming, mining, and agricultural activities, have impacted Utah Lake water quality significantly. In this project, I propose to use historical images of the Utah Lake ecosystem and available water quality data for Utah Lake to access how land use has changed over time, how these human related activities have affected water quality, and track various pollution sources to Utah Lake. The historical images sourced from Google Earth, Landsat imagery and high resolution LiDAR data will be used to evaluate the land use change around Utah Lake using GIS (Geographic Information System) spatial analysis techniques. In addition, water quality data from previous research projects I was involved in will be used in the mapping process to track water pollution sources to Utah Lake over time. Upon completion of this project, I will be able to:
1. Map how land use and population have changed around Utah Lake since pioneer settlement
2. Spatially assess the pollution sources to Utah Lake
3. Suggest how to change and manage the current land use around Utah Lake in order to protect Utah Lake water quality
This project will provide useful maps and visualizations of spatial information of human impacts on the Utah Lake ecosystem. Utah faces a future that includes population growth and climate change, both of which potentially influence the region’s hydrologic system and therefore can affect water availability and quality necessary for human consumption and use. This project will help us to understand how anthropogenic activities have impacted the Utah Lake ecosystem visually, and provide insights for state agencies to implement meaningful water and land-use management plans in the region.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Weihong Wang

Weihong Wang

Assistant Professor, Utah Valley University
Dr. Weihong Wang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth Science at Utah Valley University. She graduated with a Ph.D. degree in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina in 2008. Her research interests include Carbon Dynamics in Wetland Ecosystems, Climate Change and Sea Level Rise, and Energy Use and Sustainability. Her current research is focusing on using multi-proxies, such as stable isotope, trace metal, 210Pb and... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 12:05pm - 12:30pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:05pm

Great Salt Lake, Who Lives Here?
Great Salt Lake, Who Lives Here?
In the 2012 Great Salt Lake Water Quality Strategy, the Utah Division of Water Quality proposed a road map for continued protection of the Lake’s water quality. One of the specific goals of the Strategy is the development of numeric criteria, or maximum allowable pollutant concentrations. The first step to develop numeric criteria is to know the specific organisms that comprise the ecosystem to be protected. To help meet this goal, an aquatic life use workshop for Great Salt Lake was held in March, 2015. Scientists who study the Lake were invited to share their data regarding aquatic life surveys on the Lake and that was compiled along with the available data from the published literature. In addition to the specific species data, collocated salinity data was also recorded. Several key data gaps were identified including experimental data regarding salinity tolerances, benthic macroinvertebrates (aka, sediment bugs), and fish populations. The presentation will summarize the results and key data gaps identified. The report and database are available at http://www.deq.utah.gov/locations/G/greatsaltlake/gslwaterquality/index.htm .

Speakers
CB

Christopher Bittner

Standards Coordinator, Utah Division of Water Quality
Mr. Bittner has over 20 years of applying environmental toxicology to both human and ecological risk assessments. Currently, Mr. Bittner is the Standards Coordinator for Utah and is Chairperson of the Utah Water Quality Standards Workgroup. The water quality Standards are the foundation for protecting water quality in Utah.



Wednesday November 16, 2016 12:05pm - 12:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:35pm

Considering the 3rd Pillar of Water Demand & Conservation: Economics
Considering the 3rd Pillar of Water Demand & Conservation: Economics
News headlines often echo predictions that Utah is running out of water because our population is growing so quickly. Utah water suppliers say there is $32 billion needed for water infrastructure repair and replacement for Utah’s growing population amid an aging water delivery system in need of repair. State and local governments are investing in numerous proposed water projects, at times generating significant controversy.

But who will pay for these water investments and what, if any, impacts will there be to our water rates? In this workshop, we explore a partnership between a Utah nonprofit organization and a community of academic PhD economists who prepared an economic analysis focusing on the expected water rate increases which would accrue from the largest proposed diversion of the Colorado River: the Lake Powell Pipeline. The workshop examines basic concepts of commodity supply and demand, the elasticity of water rate price upon future water demand and how this information is being used by the public, water suppliers and the State of Utah. We also explore why the economics of water use are so often ignored in water policy and water conservation discussions.

Speakers
GB

Gail Blattenberger

Economics Profressor, University of Utah
Gail Blattenberger, longtime professor of economics at the University of Utah, has devoted her life to three causes — peace, poverty, and the environment. Her lifetime commitment to those causes has earned her the Gandhi Peace Award presented annually by the Gandhi Peace Alliance. Blattenberger became a professor in the economics department at the University of Utah in 1997. She taught econometrics, environmental economics and macroeconomics... Read More →
ZF

Zach Frankel

Executive Director, Utah Rivers Council
Zach Frankel is the founder and Executive Director of the Utah Rivers Council. Zach started the organization in 1995 after he received his B.S. in Biology at the University of Utah. Zach has been working on water education and conservation across the American West for over 25 years. He successfully defeated a proposed dam on the Diamond Fork River in 1997 and authored Utah’s first water conservation legislation, the Utah Water Conservation Plan... Read More →
GL

Gabriel Lozada

University of Utah, Economics Department
My general field is microeconomic theory/mathematical economics. My area of specialization is the theory of exhaustible resource extraction and sustainability. "Theory" here means that I don't use empirical data in my research, just mathematical explorations of exploiting an abstract resource "x". Another interest of mine is the application of the Second Law of Thermodymanics (the "Entropy Law") to Economics (I have a BS in physics). I teach... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 12:35pm - 1:00pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

12:35pm

Utah Lake Eutrophication: Role of Sediment-Water Column Interactions
Utah Lake Eutrophication: Role of Sediment-Water Column Interactions
Utah Lake is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States in terms of surface area with a maximum length and width of 24 and 13 miles, and has a surface area of roughly 375 km2 (145 square miles). It is a shallow lake with an average depth of approximately 9-10 feet during normal reservoir operating conditions with a storage capacity of 902,400 acre feet (Psomas & SWCA, 2007). The lake is managed as a reservoir to have a minimum surface elevation of 4,489 feet above sea level to maintain a consistent shoreline.

Utah Lake is considered hypereutrophic in terms of trophic status and experiences extreme algal blooms in the late summer and fall throughout the lake (Psomas & SWCA, 2007). Low dissolved oxygen, or anoxic, events have not been observed in Utah Lake and this is attributed to the shallow lake being well mixed and wind induced reaeration. There is an increasing concern about the role of nutrients, especially phosphorus, in contributing to Utah Lake water quality. This has led to a lots of debate about sources and sinks of phosphorus in Utah Lake among the local community. Phosphorus is a tricky nutrient whose fate is primarily pH dependent. In this EPA and UDWQ funded research, we closely looked at P in the sediments and looked at its speciation, sediment minerology and potential of release under changed DO and pH conditions.

More recently, we have collected five more sediment cores from the Utah Lake and are in the process of evaluating parameters which will be useful for Utah Lake modeling efforts let by the University of Utah and Utah DWQ. Water column samples collected show the correlation between nutrients, chlorophyll a, and cyanotoxin with water quality and lake bottom sediments. Majority of phosphorus in Utah Lake sediments is calcite bound which can only be immobilized under low pH conditions. We also developed an in-house toxin measurement method based on high performance liquid chromatography. The samples collected and analyzed did not show toxin concentrations above world health organization’s prescribed limits. The sediments were a source of dissolved N and P while the water column was a sink, and once again this was associated with plankton bioassimilation. The sediments in Utah Lake proper were similar in terms of %TS and roughly 37% of the VS were organic carbon, and are composed primarily of carbonate and clay minerals which are easily resuspended. The high carbonate content, elevated ambient pH, and alkalinity provide a pathway for abiotic P precipitation. In-situ sediment oxygen demand measurements revealed that the Utah Lake water column is responsible for the majority of the ambient oxygen demand, not SOD, and was associated with phytoplankton respiration and decay.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Anwar Alsanea

Anwar Alsanea

Graduate Student, University of Utah - Civil and Environmental Engineering
Anwar is a graduate student at the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah.
RG

Ramesh Goel

Associate Professor, University of Utah
Dr. Ramesh Goel is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah. He obtained his PhD from South Carolina and post doctoral training form the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was a visiting professor at EAWAG aquatic institute in Switzerland. He is currently serving as an associate editor of Water Research and Water Environment Research


Wednesday November 16, 2016 12:35pm - 1:00pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

1:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

1:30pm

"Watershed Steward of the Year" Award Ceremony & Prize Drawing
"Watershed Steward of the Year" Award Ceremony & Prize Drawing
All Symposium participants are encouraged to nominate a 2016 Watershed Steward of the Year. Everyone who participates will be entered into a drawing to win awesome prizes. Woohoo!

This award is given to an individual who is nominated by peers in the community to be recognized and celebrated as a watershed hero! This individual should qualify as someone who successfully helps to restore and improve our rivers and watershed, someone who consistently works to sustain the health of our rivers and someone we think about while drinking, kayaking, fishing and enjoying our waters. 

The award ceremony and drawing will be held during lunch. 

The Watershed Steward of the Year award is new to the Symposium and we hope to continue this environmentally emblematic recognition in the years to come. 

Wednesday November 16, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
1_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GREAT HALL 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

2:00pm

Identifying Contributing Factors to Utah Lake Algal Blooms
Identifying Contributing Factors to Utah Lake Algal Blooms
This past summer saw one of the largest toxic algae blooms in the region’s recent history spread from Utah Lake and along the entire stretch of the Jordan River. The large amount of biomass and presence of toxins affected local recreation, and several communities who were forced to shut off their secondary water supply which comes from the Jordan River. The magnitude and extent of the bloom led to widespread concern and raised a number of questions including: What caused the bloom? Were there any warning signs? Which areas were affected the most? What were conditions like throughout the water system?
In order to address these questions and better understand what happened with this and other blooms in the region, we calibrate several lake-specific models using historical data for chlorophyll-a (an indicator of algal biomass) and satellite-measured reflected radiance from the surface of the lake, and apply the models to the Utah Lake and Great Salt Lake region. We then identify regions of the system which have been historically particularly susceptible to blooms through classification and geospatial statistical techniques. A number of climate factors (including air temperature, wind speed and direction, and precipitation) and lake characteristics, such as lake levels and nutrients are evaluated to determine whether these factors may have contributed to the large algal bloom of July 2016, as well as past blooms. This application of remote sensing provides valuable opportunities for enhanced visualization and knowledge of the magnitude and extent of blooms in the region. Additionally, an improved understanding of the conditions/factors which cause algal blooms and the locations which are likely to be affected in the future may benefit water quality monitoring and management agencies in the area.

Speakers
avatar for Carly Hansen

Carly Hansen

PhD Candidate, University of Utah
Carly is a PhD Candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Utah, working in the Urban Water Research Group under the direction of Dr. Steven Burian.



Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:00pm - 2:25pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

2:00pm

The Business of Water: Lessons from Coca-Cola Watershed Replenishment
The Business of Water: Lessons from Coca-Cola Watershed Replenishment
At Swire Coca-Cola USA, we have seen the sense in conserving natural resources since the very beginning of our business journey. We have a vested business interest in protecting the water resources in the communities in which we operate; where we produce refreshing Coca-Cola products is where we also distribute and sell them. In order to maintain the most important material for our business—water—we have to work hard to protect natural water sources.

One of our major initiatives toward protecting the water resources around us is called the Replenish project. In collaboration with The Coca-Cola Company, we work to implement conservation projects that restore the water supplies of natural water bodies like rivers and wetlands. In 2007, The Coca-Cola Company and all of its bottling partners, including ourselves, set the goal of returning 100% of the water that goes into our finished products back to nature and communities. By the end of 2015, the Coca-Cola system achieved 100% replenishment globally.

In Utah, we have worked in the Chalk Creek watershed to improve stream flows by implementing conservation irrigation for a local rancher and by removing a fish migration barrier. Secondly, we work with The Nature Conservancy at Jesse Creek in Idaho to restore a dry section of the stream. Our manufacturing plant in Fruitland, Idaho sources its water from the Jesse Creek watershed. We are also evaluating a third project in the upper Bear River watershed in Wyoming. This project would restore the habitats and passage for local trout by replenishing an estimate of billions of liters to nature.

In partnership with The Coca-Cola Company, we’ve learned that there are several necessary steps to implementing a successful replenishment project. The first step is to map the water. Coca-Cola does this by completing source water vulnerability assessments for our business operating areas. We have completed Source Water Vulnerability Assessments for each of our manufacturing facilities, utilizing the expert knowledge of third-party hydrogeologists. Following these vulnerability assessments, we have also developed Source Water Protection Plans, which work to protect the watersheds in our operating areas. We operate in the western U.S., from Portland to Denver to Phoenix. Our goal is to protect watersheds throughout these areas, some of which have limited water availability.

The second lesson that Swire Coca-Cola has learned from Replenish projects is the value of partnerships. We partner with environmental nonprofits, customers such as universities, and other members of the Coca-Cola system. Swire Coca-Cola has partnered with Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF), Trout Unlimited, The Nature Conservancy, and Coca-Cola North America on three restoration projects in Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming.

Thirdly, to build on the importance of partnership, we have found that active collaboration and engagement in these programs is vital to the success of watershed restoration projects. Collaboration with our partners has allowed us to identify suitable Replenish sites and to successfully implement restoration projects. The Replenish projects at Jesse Creek and Chalk Creek return 275 million liters of water to nature annually.

Moderators
avatar for Alyson Eddie

Alyson Eddie

Senior Biologist, Logan Simpson

Speakers
avatar for Meagan Knowlton

Meagan Knowlton

Sustainability & Environmental Specialist, Swire Coca-Cola, USA
Meagan Knowlton is a Sustainability and Environmental Specialist for Swire Coca-Cola, USA, a bottling company based in Draper, UT. She enjoys creating shared value for companies and the environment via environmental and sustainability initiatives. Her expertise lies in watershed health and water sustainability. She received a Master of Environmental Management with a concentration in Water Resources Management from Duke University. She also holds... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:00pm - 2:25pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

2:30pm

Phased Reclamation at the Jordan River, Midvale Utah
Phased Reclamation at the Jordan River, Midvale Utah
Jordan River riparian restoration was conducted as part of the final remedy for the Midvale Slag Superfund Site. Phase I of the riparian restoration called for the replacement of a damaged and dangerous sheet pile dam that was built to maintain river bank stability for the portion of the Jordan River running adjacent to the Site. The dam reduces bank erosion and prevents the release of buried contaminants into the river and other adjacent properties. A river energy/flow survey of was conducted to develop a two-dimensional model to evaluate the hydraulic characteristics of the river at different stream flows. The model allowed EPA to determine where the highest velocities occurred and indicated areas susceptible to erosion and/or migration of stream flows out of the current channel. The model also provided water-surface elevations throughout the reach for various streamflow’s and aided in planning where increased cross sectional areas were needed and where to install velocity abatement structures. Information obtained from the model was used to curb the effects of erosion and strengthen the stability of the cap for the Midvale Site. In addition, two doctorate summer interns were hired to conduct detailed soil and weed studies for information used for planning future phased work.

Phase 2 of the riparian effort included replacing debris/weeded areas with native plants, and some armoring. This Phase included outreach to the community on a variety of projects including education, building bridge abutments for future pedestrian bridges to be built by the city and developers, weed mitigation, pedestrian trail expansion, and improved river access for recreational use. Additionally, Phase 2 included opening up the river up-stream to slow the flow to reduce potential damage downstream. Phases 4 and 5 were a continuance of earlier phases making adjustments.

The reclamation portion of the Superfund work was conducted using Veteran Owned Small Business and Minority Owned Small Business as well as task specific grants to Salt Lake County and the USGS. In short, the work conducted was cost effective using mostly local resources.

Moderators
avatar for Alyson Eddie

Alyson Eddie

Senior Biologist, Logan Simpson

Speakers
avatar for Erna Waterman

Erna Waterman

Remedial Project Manager/Env. Engineer, US EPA - Region 8
Erna has worked as a project manager in the EPA Superfund Program for 25 years, in addition she worked for a year in the RCRA permit program for a year. She has both a civil engineering and geology degrees and enjoys working on Utah projects.



Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:30pm - 2:55pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

2:30pm

Spatiotemporal Variability of Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms
Spatiotemporal Variability of Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms
Cyanobacteria cause a multitude of water-quality concerns, including potential production of taste-and-odor compounds and toxins. Taste-and-odor compounds cause malodorous or unpalatable drinking water and fish, resulting in increased treatment costs and loss of aquacultural and recreational revenue. Cyanotoxins have been implicated in human and animal illness and death in over fifty countries worldwide, including at least 36 U.S. States. The study of cyanobacteria and associated compounds presents several unique challenges. For example, 1) complex mixtures of cyanotoxins and taste-and-odor compounds are common in mixed-assemblage cyanobacterial blooms, 2) spatiotemporal variability is characteristic of blooms, and occurrence of cyanobacteria, cyanotoxins, and taste-and-odor compounds may vary substantially within relatively short distances and periods of time, and 3) relations between spatiotemporal dynamics and environmental conditions are unique to individual systems and are the complex result of the interactions between biological, physicochemical, and hydrologic factors. In the face of these challenges, continuous-water-quality monitors, remote sensing, genetic techniques, and in situ field experiments have supplemented traditional limnological studies. These new approaches have facilitated the development of tools to provide early warning systems for occurrence that guide management and public health decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Graham

Jennifer Graham

Research Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey
Jennifer Graham, PhD, has been a research hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Lawrence, Kansas since 2006. Since 1997, Jennifer’s research has focused on the effects of anthropogenic influence on aquatic ecosystems. She also is a nationally recognized expert in cyanobacteria and associated nuisance compounds. For the past seventeen years she has conducted research on environmental factors influencing the occurrence of cyanotoxins... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 2:30pm - 2:55pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:05pm

Cyanotoxins and Cell counts: Managing Risk When Cyanobacteria Bloom
Cyanotoxins and Cell counts: Managing Risk When Cyanobacteria Bloom
The recent cyanobacteria bloom on Utah Lake and the accompanying never-ending DWQ and media blitzkrieg has done an effective job in razing public interest and even hysteria in the occurrence of these blooms. This activity has brought out the best and worst of mobilizing agency response and the actual actions that were taken. Lake-side businesses were closed in addition to the hit on ancillary recreational outlets that normally accompanies a summer on Utah Lake. Moreover, these actions stymied our farmers ability to raise valuable local crops and may ultimately affect the farmers' ability to market their goods as the nightly news prattled on and lake closure continued day after day. This Aphanizomenon bloom provides a great example why a more thoughtful, scientific and measured approach to managing human risk is warranted.

Speakers
TM

Theron Miller

Research Scientist, Jordan River/Farmington Bay Water Quality Council
Theron Miller Bio | Education: | BS Wildlife Sciences, Utah State University, a long time ago | BS Aquatic Sciences, Utah State University, a little bit after | MS Aquatic Toxicology, University of Alberta, a couple years after that | PhD Environmental Biology and Ecology, University of Alberta, a few years after that | Career highlights: | Fishery Biologist, US Bureau of Reclamation, Ecological aspects of largemouth bass reproduction in... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:05pm - 3:30pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:05pm

The Jordan River…Size Matters
The Jordan River…Size Matters
The Jordan River has changed in size, shape and function over the past century. In that same time span, the river's ability to convey water, sediment and process pollutants has also changed. Is there a significant nexus between the morphological divergence and the river's water quality degradation? This presentation will explore the possible nexus and a pilot program to test this hypothesis and implement the Jordan River TMDL. 

Speakers
LK

Lewis Kogan

Open Space Lands Program Manager, Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands
avatar for Robert Thompson

Robert Thompson

Watershed Section Manager, Salt Lake County Watershed Planning & Restoration
Robert Thompson manages the Salt Lake County Watershed section and is a professionally licensed Geologist in the state of Utah. He specializes in fluvial geomorphology and the restoration of fluvial systems. He has a background in water quality data collection, restoration design, construction and monitoring and education. His outside interests include river running, cycling and trail running.
avatar for Tom Ward

Tom Ward

Deputy Director, Salt Lake City Public Utilities
Tom Ward obtained his Civil & Environmental Engineering degree from Gonzaga University and has focused his career on environmental studies, design, construction and management of water/wastewater conveyance, treatment, flood control and water quality systems. Tom's career includes design, grant funding and construction of several river restoration projects in Washington, Idaho, Nevada and Utah, including constructed wetlands, fish ladders, and... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:05pm - 3:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:35pm

Birds Provide Insight for Stewardship of Urban Riparian Areas
Birds Provide Insight for Stewardship of Urban Riparian Areas
Our riparian areas are important and complex components of Salt Lake County’s urban mosaic, and they provide benefits to both human and animal inhabitants. Multiple streams, creeks, and the Jordan River supply resources, ecosystem services, recreational opportunities, and access to natural spaces for Salt Lake County residents, and these waterbodies also yield critical habitat for our urban bird communities. However, urban riparian areas are heavily impacted by diverse human uses and historic disturbances, which create complex consequences to river and stream health. Since 2011, Tracy Aviary’s citizen science program has developed and implemented a series of participatory bird monitoring projects in urban riparian areas throughout the Salt Lake County Watershed. Our projects include diverse objective, partners, stakeholders, and geographic locations, but they all investigate avian use of urban riparian habitat. Patterns of bird occurrence, distribution, and community composition can serve as important indicators of watershed quality and overall ecosystem health, and data we have collected over the years have increased our understanding of local avian ecology, best management practices, and how to balance competing objectives for our region’s riparian areas.

Speakers
avatar for Cooper Farr

Cooper Farr

Conservation Scientist, Tracy Aviary
Cooper leads the Conservation Science Program at Tracy Aviary, which contributes to bird conservation efforts by increasing knowledge about birds and their habitats. The Conservation Science Program supports conservation and field research projects in our home state of Utah, and in other places throughout North, South, and Central America. We provide a range of citizen science opportunities to allow a broad and diverse community of people to... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:35pm - 4:00pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

3:35pm

Land Use Changes and Implications for Forest Service Management
Land Use Changes and Implications for Forest Service Management
The presentation would show examples of changes in land use using historic aerial photos of Alta/Snowbird, mouth of Little Cottonwood, and perhaps the Draper area. It would show the transition from a rural to urban interface between Forest Service and non-Forest lands and how this affects the way we manage Forest lands.

Speakers
CC

Charles Condrat

Soil and Water Program Manager, USDA Forest Service
Charles R. Condrat is the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Soil and Water Program Manager and has worked as a Forest Hydrologist on National Forests in northern Utah since 1991. Before this, as a consultant he worked in surface and groundwater assessments and worked seasonally as a forest technician, land surveyor, and fire fighter. He has assessed environmental effects to soil and water resources on a wide variety of projects including timber... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:35pm - 4:00pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

4:05pm

Landscape Lab: Merging Science & Design for a Landscape of Learning
Landscape Lab: Merging Science & Design for a Landscape of Learning
Many so-called sustainable solutions to the challenges of urban systems rely on across-the-board application of a set of “best practices” which are often developed elsewhere and may or may not have been rigorously tested or monitored. Such best practices are probably an improvement over the alternative conventional practices, in that they probably do less ecological damage, however we believe there is a better way to engage in landscape and urban design that tests best practices in situ, and offers the opportunity to innovate and generate knowledge, shortening the time lag between research and application. We present a landscape transformation project, the Landscape Lab, on the University of Utah research campus on Red Butte Creek, that has been developed as a collaborative design project between university research faculty and landscape architects. The goal of this merging of scientific and design processes is to create a landscape that is beautiful and engaging, ecologically revitalized, and that serves to build our pool of understanding about ecological restoration and water management in urban landscapes in our unique climate of northern Utah. We will discuss the unique challenges of this merged process, and the considerable potential it holds for changing the way we shape our built environment.

Participants will learn about some of the primary challenges and barriers to creating sustainable urban landscapes in Utah, and opportunities to overcome these by forging new partnerships between different disciplines.

Moderators
avatar for Joe Donaldson

Joe Donaldson

Sr. Landscape Architect/ Environmental Planner, Ecology & Environment, Inc.
Environmental consulting in public and private sectors for projects throughout the western U.S. Projects have included planning and design for flood control, groundwater recharge, reservoirs, stream corridors, wildlife refuges, and recreation and open space areas and have involved ecological restoration, recreation planning, public use management, visual impact assessment, natural resource planning and management, endangered species protection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Laura Bandara

Laura Bandara

Community Planner & Landscape Designer, VODA Landscape + Planning
An award-winning landscape designer, Laura Bandara has engaged in a wide range of design and planning work from the iconic scale of Pearl Harbor, Hawai‘i to the city block scale of Salt Lake's Regent Street. Emerging from a background in political science and landscape architecture, her work explores the intersections of ecology and culture, past and future, everyday and extraordinary.
avatar for Brenda Bowen

Brenda Bowen

Geoscientist, University of Utah
Brenda is an interdisciplinary geoscientist who received a B.S. and M.S. in Earth Science from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Utah where her doctoral research focused on the history of fluid flow in the Navajo Sandstone. She worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Central Michigan University studying the geochemical evolution of acidic brines in southern Western Australia, and then... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Hinners

Sarah Hinners

Director, Ecological Planning Center, University of Utah
Sarah Hinners, PhD is a landscape and urban ecologist on the faculty of the Department of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah, and the Acting Director of the Ecological Planning Center. She has a degree in Geography and Environmental Studies from McGill University in Montreal, and a PhD in Ecology from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She focuses her efforts as a researcher, educator, and community member on building... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:05pm - 4:30pm
2_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: GALLERY 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119

4:05pm

Retrofitting Urban Streets to Green Streets: Lessons Learned
Retrofitting Urban Streets to Green Streets: Lessons Learned
Stormwater planter boxes and biofiltration systems are a sustainable stormwater Best Management Practice option for use in "Green Street" retrofit applications and roadway improvements projects. Applying stormwater flow-through planter boxes that are designed to capture and remove stormwater runoff pollutants conveyed in public streets poses a difficult challenge for many Green Street project designers, landscape architects and civil engineers.

Conventional design regimens for stormwater planter box systems typically require large areas of space along sidewalks and curb areas so as to properly convey a design volume of runoff for capture and infiltration inside flow-through biofiltration systems in the public right-of-way. In high-density areas, there are typically little or no opportunities to place stormwater planter box systems along roadways or sidewalks due to existing infrastructure and underground utilities.

This presentation provides civil engineers, planners, landscape architects, designers, and project developers with various alternative space-saving solutions to applying smaller, more compact “Green Street” flow-through planter boxes and Tree Box Filters where and when available space is limited in a public roadway or street.

Specific project examples using space-saving stormwater planter box systems will be provided along with detailed information on the proper design, components, installation and costs for applying stormwater planter box systems.

Attendees will learn the difference between planter box system types, design and performance criteria as well as limitations for use in public right-of-way retrofit applications. Attendees will walk away with practical guidelines for evaluating candidate sites in conjunction with identifying various choices of planter box types that may or may not be applicable for a particular Green Street retrofit location.

Example stormwater planter box projects will be showcased in this presentation with reference to high-density locations at major cities in the USA, including projects located in cities of Portland (OR), Los Angeles, San Diego, Philadelphia, Minneapolis and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Speakers
avatar for William Harris

William Harris

National Sales Manager, Bio Clean Environmental / Forterra
William Harris has been active in the environmental industry for over 25 years with an extensive and diversified background in stormwater management and treatment technologies. Mr. Harris has successfully introduced a variety of new and innovative stormwater treatment systems and products for use in private, public and industrial sector markets throughout the USA. In addition, Mr. Harris has extensive knowledge in regulatory compliance measures... Read More →



Wednesday November 16, 2016 4:05pm - 4:30pm
3_Utah Cultural Celebration Center: ROOM 104/105 1355 W 3100 S, West Valley City UT 84119